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1 million views: Sirona's YouTube channel breaks records

YouTube is one of the most important social media platforms along with Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. That is why Sirona set up its own YouTube channel in April 2012. "It is important to us to reach our target audience using as many communication channels as possible. On YouTube, we focus on vivid film material, exciting content and quality in every respect," says Dr. Jürgen Serafin, Corporate Vice President at Sirona. "We are delighted that our subscribers appreciate this." Besides product presentations, the YouTube channel also features videos about the company and events, such as the 30-year anniversary of CEREC. The success of the channel is evident not only by the high click rates but also the time spent watching each video. "Our films are viewed for an average of 1:52 minutes. This confirms to us that the content is interesting," says Andreas Blauig enthusiastically. As a way of saying thank you to its subscribers, Sirona has made a best-of video: https://youtu.be/BMI7gGiMZyU

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How sharks could aid human tooth Regeneration

A new study may bring us a step closer to human tooth regeneration, by shedding light on how sharks regrow their pearly whites. Sharks can have up to 3,000 teeth at any one time, spread over multiple rows. Unlike our teeth, sharks' teeth are embedded in the gums rather than the jaw. Researchers have long known that sharks have the ability to continuously regrow their teeth; they lose at least 30,000 teeth over a lifetime, but each one lost can be individually regrown over a period of days or months. The genetic mechanisms underlying this process, however, have been unclear. Now, study leader Dr. Gareth Fraser, from the Department of Animal and Plant Sciences at the University of Sheffield in the UK, and colleagues have identified a network of genes that are responsible for tooth development and lifelong tooth regeneration in sharks. Because humans possess the same genes, the team says the discovery could help develop new treatments for human tooth loss. They publish their findings in the journal Developmental Biology.

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What You Wear Can Ease Anxiety

Dental anxiety plays a significant role in pediatric care. One recent study from the Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre in Bhopal, India, suggests that how the dentist is dressed can play a significant role in easing those fears. It also suggests that gender has an effect on how the child feels. The researchers surveyed 1,155 children between the ages of 9 and 12 about their previous dental and medical experiences and if they preferred male or female dentists. The children additionally ranked their reaction to various aspects of dental treatment, from not afraid to very afraid, indicating their level of dental anxiety. Also, the children viewed 4 photographs of an anonymous male dentist wearing 4 different aprons in a single clinical setup. Two of the outfits were formal and white, while the others were stylish and in blue and green. The children were then asked which outfit they preferred. According to the survey, 718 (or 62%) of the children were anxious, and 437 (38%) were not. Also, 610 (85%) of the anxious children were girls, while 108 (15%) were boys. The researchers said the disproportionate rates between boys and girls may be indicative of the greater rates of anxiety and, specifically, dental anxiety among females in general. Of the anxious children, 502 (69.9%) said they preferred the colorful attire, while 216 (30.1%) chose conventional attire. The researchers noted that children perceive colors as pleasing and link color to positive instead of negative emotions. Furthermore, 246 (34%) of the anxious children preferred male dentists, while 452 (66%) of them preferred female dentists. Among the nonanxious children, 200 (46%) preferred male dentists, and 237 (54%) preferred female dentists. However, 244 (68.5%) of the boys chose male dentists, while 597 (75%) of the girls preferred female dentists, indicating same-gender preferences for both boys and girls.The researchers concluded that information about the anxiety of pediatric patients may be useful in distracting them with their own preferences. The study, “A Survey of the Dentist Attire and Gender Preferences in Dentally Anxious Children,” was published by the Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry.

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RESEARCH REVEALS A NEW WAY TO ADMINISTER ANESTHETIC IN THE MOUTH

If you're scared of the dentist's needles you're not alone - but new research means you might not have to put off that appointment again. A study published in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces reveals how the dentist could give you anesthetic using a tiny electric current instead of a needle. The researchers behind the study, from the University of São Paulo, say their new findings could help improve dental procedures and bring relief to millions of people who are scared of needles. It would also save money and avoid contamination and infection, they say. "Needlefree administration could save costs, improve patient compliance, facilitate application and decrease the risks of intoxication and contamination," explained Professor Renata Fonseca Vianna Lopez, one of the authors of the study from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil. "This may facilitate access to more effective and safe dental treatments for thousands of people around the world."

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BANGALORE DENTIST WILL BE FACE OF IPHONE ADS

During Diwali 2015, Ashish Parmar, a Bengaluru-based photographer, was celebrating the day with his family. Capturing the festivity, he took a random shot of his wife Raina Nanaiahm, a practicing dentist, holding a diya in her hand, from his iPhone 6S. Like most of us would do, he posted that picture on Instagram. The image in question had “hardly been edited” for Ashish Parmar, impressed Apple Inc and was chosen by them among 53 best pictures clicked across the globe, for its ‘Shot on iPhone 6S’ campaign. This was the only picture selected from India and will be used for hoardings globally.

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Report States Parents Should Learn First Aid

It’s important for parents to know basic dental first aid, according to a new study. The American Academy of Pediatrics compiled a study about why parents should know dental first aid before their child visits a dentist in the case of an emergency This way, the parents can react correctly in emergency situations and provide enough aid for the child before seeing the dentist. The time period between the emergency and treatment can be significant in some cases.The academy recently released a set of guidelines on how to deal with such situations. If the child is treated correctly and there is a minimal amount of time between the injury and the dental visit, the child generally ends up ok. The report also includes rules for doctors to treat dental injuries to minimize the damage. Despite the importance of the dental first aid, there is no course of action better than actually visiting the dentist. But it’s certainly beneficial when parents are aware of dental first aid. Visit: www.aap.org for details.

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DENTSPLY & SIRONA DENTAL SYSTEMS UNITE, FORM NEW ENTITY

DENTSPLY Sirona Inc. recently announced the completion of the merger between DENTSPLY International and Sirona Dental Systems. The merged entity, will now be known as DENTSPLY Sirona. Under the terms of the newly-inked deal, DENTSPLY shareholders will now hold 58% while Sirona shareholders will own 42% of the combined company. The united entity is already touted as one of the leading global manufacturers of professional dental products and materials. DENTSPLY Sirona will offer a range of complementary products for dental offices - from fluoride rinses to dental chairs. The combined unit is also likely to achieve consequential cost and revenue synergies, on the back of expanded product portfolio, bigger customer base and better infrastructure. In fact, the merger is expected to deliver annual pre-tax synergies of more than $125 million by the third year following the close of the deal. "With our merger complete, Dentsply Sirona can now focus its efforts on empowering dental professionals to provide better, safer and faster dental care," Jeffrey T. Slovin, Dentsply Sirona's CEO, said in the release.

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Oral-B unveils toothbrush with position detection technology

There was a lot of activity around Oral-B's stand at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona recently as it unveiled its latest smart toothbrush, the Oral-B Genius. This new device has "position detection technology" as well as a couple of other slicker design features. The user places their smartphone in a robust-looking holder on the mirror in front of them. Then they need to fire up the dedicated Oral-B app, position their face in front of their smartphone's front-facing camera and begin to brush. Motion sensors inside the brush detect the areas being brushed. As the user brushes they can watch the screen in front of them to essentially play the game of brushing their teeth. A little circle with segments represents their mouth, incentivizing the user to brush for the correct amount of time in each area of their mouth by making the color of each segment fade as they go. Oral-B says this is based on the insight that up to 80% of people spend an insufficient amount of time brushing at least one zone inside their mouth. The Oral-B app encourages users to spend time on each individual zone in their mouth. Users brush away the blue coloring in each of the segments before moving on to the next. Users need to sync their phone with the app around every two weeks in order to save their data to the app and check their progress, which can also be shared with their dentist. The Oral-B GENIUS will be available in select markets starting in July 2016. Prices are expected to be somewhere between $200 and $300.

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19 SLOTH BEARS UNDERGO DENTAL SURGERY

In a first of its kind operation, 19 endangered sloth bears, rescued from their lives as ‘dancing’ bears, underwent dental surgeries to remove tumors caused by broken teeth. The bears were rescued by Delhi-based NGO Wildlife SOS which has been working to end the brutal practice of dancing bears across India. The bears underwent the three-hour-long surgery at the NGO’s bear rescue facility in Agra. The bears were poached from the wild as cubs and abused by captors. When rescued, their teeth were found to be in bad shape due to abuse. The bears were treated by four veterinary dentists from the United Kingdom. The bears are showing good signs of recovery after the successful surgeries. “I anticipate that the bears should recover from the treatment in the next two weeks, during which time the diet will be fed soft mashed fruits, with supplements and painkillers. We can already see a considerable positive change in the bears. The dental treatment has brought significant improvement in their overall health,” said Arun A Sha, Wildlife SOS veterinary director.

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BITE-MARK ANALYSIS CAN LEAD TO FALSE CONVICTIONS, LANDMARK RESEARCH SHOWS

Forensic science is a vital crime-fighting tool in today's criminal justice system. But it can also lead to false convictions, according to H. David Sheets, PhD. Landmark research by the Canisius College physics professor proves that bitemark analysis is "far from an exact science." Bite-mark analysis compares the teeth of crime suspects to bite-mark patterns on victims. Historically, forensic odontologists (dentists who provide forensic dental identifications in criminal investigations and mass disasters) operate under two general guidelines when interpreting bite-mark evidence. First, that everyone's dental impression is unique to the individual, "similar to fingerprints, Second, that human skin — the most common material on which a bite mark is inflicted — reliably records an individual's dental impression. Bite-mark analysis is widely accepted in criminal courts and often presented as key evidence in prosecutions. Using a variety of dental impressions, the team examined more than 1,000 human dentitions and studied hundreds of bite marks in cadaver skin. With the help of computer analysis and applied statistics, the team then worked to match its database of bite marks to the correct dental impressions. "When the dental alignments were similar, it was difficult to distinguish exactly which set of teeth made which bites," Sheets says. "That tells us that a single bite mark is not distinct enough to be linked to a specific individual. It can actually point to many different individuals." This means that a false identification is possible, which can lead a police investigation away from the real perpetrator and towards an innocent individual. The Canisius-UB studies are among the largest conducted on bite-mark analysis and the first to use human-skin models. More notable is that its findings call into question criminal convictions that rested entirely on bite-mark evidence.

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IIT students develop low cost dental chair

Three students of design program of IITKanpur along with a team of students from PUJ (Pontificia Universidad Javeriana) university based in Colombia in the US, under the guidance of IIT-Kanpur faculty members have remained successful in developing a very low cost dental chair worth Rs 20,000 only. This is said to be the cheapest dental chair in the Indian market. The affordable dental chair developed under the ME310 (name of a course) program run at Stanford University has been named as 'FLux". The prototype of the chair has been installed at Sardar Patel postgraduate institute of medical and dental sciences in Lucknow where it is being used successfully since September 2015. This has raised hope that the mass production of this dental chair could be done in near future which would further bring down the cost. The development of this dental chair has received applause from project director, Standford university, Larry Lifer. The most unique feature of this dental chair being that it is very patient friendly.

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